edge-of-existence-edge:

While the demonic poison frog is reportedly common on the Cerro Yapacana tepui, the total area of its forest habitat is only ten square kilometres.  Because the area is also used for gold mining, and both the pollution and fires that go along with it, the frog is considered critically endangered.

edge-of-existence-edge:

While the demonic poison frog is reportedly common on the Cerro Yapacana tepui, the total area of its forest habitat is only ten square kilometres.  Because the area is also used for gold mining, and both the pollution and fires that go along with it, the frog is considered critically endangered.

cool-critters:

Araripe manakin (Antilophia bokermanni)

The Araripe manakin is a critically endangered bird from the family of manakins. As typical of most manakins, males and females have a strong sexual dimorphism in the colors of the plumage. The strikingly patterned males have a predominantly white plumage with black wings and tail. From the frontal tuft, over the crown, down to the middle back runs a carmine red patch. The iris is red. The females are mainly olive green. This species is endemic to the Chapada do Araripe (Araripe uplands) in the Brazilian state of Ceará in the north eastern region of the country. In 2000 there was an estimated population of less than 50 individuals and it was considered as one of the rarest birds in Brazil and in the world.

photo credits: wiki, wiki, abcbirds

rhamphotheca:

National Black-footed Ferret Conservation Center
Here is one of our ferret moms and her kits out in the preconditioning pens today. She is teaching her kits how to kill prairie dogs and be ferrets. They will be released in the wild this month.
The USFWS’ National Black-footed Ferret Conservation Center (FCC), located in northern Colorado, houses 60-70% of all captive black-footed ferrets (BFF), which are a critically endangered species. The FCC serves as the hub for everything related to BFF recovery. Together with our partners we produce as many BFF kits as possible for reintroduction efforts & to maintain the captive population while minimizing the loss of genetic diversity.
(find out more: http://www.blackfootedferret.org/)

rhamphotheca:

Here is one of our ferret moms and her kits out in the preconditioning pens today. She is teaching her kits how to kill prairie dogs and be ferrets. They will be released in the wild this month.

The USFWS’ National Black-footed Ferret Conservation Center (FCC), located in northern Colorado, houses 60-70% of all captive black-footed ferrets (BFF), which are a critically endangered species. The FCC serves as the hub for everything related to BFF recovery. Together with our partners we produce as many BFF kits as possible for reintroduction efforts & to maintain the captive population while minimizing the loss of genetic diversity.

(find out more: http://www.blackfootedferret.org/)

libutron:

The Onore’s Harlequin Frog - A toad that jumped from its description to its extinction
Although it is commonly known as Onore’s Harlequin Frog, Atelopus onorei is actually a toad in the Bufonidae family, which is distinguished from other Atelopus species by its color patterns in yellow-orange and green, and by its aqua-blue iris.
This beautiful species was described just in 2007 from specimens formerly allocated to Atelopus bomolochos, and is only known from its type locality (near Río Chipla and a nearby creek, in the Azuay Basin of the Cordillera Occidental of Ecuador, Azuay Province, Ecuador). 
As many species of harlequin frogs (the genus Atelopus) across Central and South America, the Onore’s harlequin frogs are vanishing, even from seemingly pristine areas. So, just a year after its description, Atelopus onorei was classified in 2008 on the IUCN Red List as Critically Endangered and Possibly Extinct.
According to Coloma et al. (2014), from the Jambatu Center for Research and Conservation of Amphibians, AnfibiosWebEcuador, Atelopus onorei was abundant at the type locality until 1990, when it was seen last. Occasional search efforts in subsequent years (1992-1993 and 2010) were unsuccessful. 
Although some authors believe that the decline of populations of this species and others may have been caused by pathogens such as chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis), it is considered that this is also a consequence of climate change.
Photo credit: (via ©Luis A. Coloma/AmphibiaWebEcuador | Locality: Ecuador
References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4] - [5]

libutron:

The Onore’s Harlequin Frog - A toad that jumped from its description to its extinction

Although it is commonly known as Onore’s Harlequin Frog, Atelopus onorei is actually a toad in the Bufonidae family, which is distinguished from other Atelopus species by its color patterns in yellow-orange and green, and by its aqua-blue iris.

This beautiful species was described just in 2007 from specimens formerly allocated to Atelopus bomolochos, and is only known from its type locality (near Río Chipla and a nearby creek, in the Azuay Basin of the Cordillera Occidental of Ecuador, Azuay Province, Ecuador). 

As many species of harlequin frogs (the genus Atelopus) across Central and South America, the Onore’s harlequin frogs are vanishing, even from seemingly pristine areas. So, just a year after its description, Atelopus onorei was classified in 2008 on the IUCN Red List as Critically Endangered and Possibly Extinct.

According to Coloma et al. (2014), from the Jambatu Center for Research and Conservation of Amphibians, AnfibiosWebEcuador, Atelopus onorei was abundant at the type locality until 1990, when it was seen last. Occasional search efforts in subsequent years (1992-1993 and 2010) were unsuccessful. 

Although some authors believe that the decline of populations of this species and others may have been caused by pathogens such as chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis), it is considered that this is also a consequence of climate change.

Photo credit: (via ©Luis A. Coloma/AmphibiaWebEcuador | Locality: Ecuador

References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4] - [5]

rhamphotheca:

TSA Turtle Tuesday: Painted Terrapin
The beautiful and critically endangered Painted Terrapin (Batagur borneonesis) is found in several countries in South East Asia where it inhabits large river systems, estuaries and mangrove forests. 
This species is sexually dimorphic, meaning there are obvious differences between the males and females. The most notable difference is their color. During the breeding season the male’s head changes from a greyish color with orange on the top to bright white with a black-edged red patch on top! 
Females, with their plain brown coloration, may be seen nesting on the same ocean beaches used by marine turtles and both hatchlings and adults can tolerate pure saltwater for short periods of time! T
Photo credit: Andrew Brinker
(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)

rhamphotheca:

TSA Turtle Tuesday: Painted Terrapin

The beautiful and critically endangered Painted Terrapin (Batagur borneonesis) is found in several countries in South East Asia where it inhabits large river systems, estuaries and mangrove forests.

This species is sexually dimorphic, meaning there are obvious differences between the males and females. The most notable difference is their color. During the breeding season the male’s head changes from a greyish color with orange on the top to bright white with a black-edged red patch on top!

Females, with their plain brown coloration, may be seen nesting on the same ocean beaches used by marine turtles and both hatchlings and adults can tolerate pure saltwater for short periods of time! T

Photo credit: Andrew Brinker

(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)

cool-critters:

Horned guan (Oreophasis derbianus)

The horned guan is a large, approximately 85 cm long, turkey-like bird. is distributed in humid mountain forests of southeast Mexico-(Chiapas) and Guatemala of Central America. Its diet consists mainly of fruits, green leaves and invertebrates. This species is the only survivor of a very ancient lineage of cracids that has been evolving independently from all other living members of this family for at least 20, possibly as much as 40 million years. Due to ongoing habitat loss, small population size, limited range and hunting in some areas, the horned guan is evaluated as Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

photo credits: revuemag, guppiecat, stlzoo

rhamphotheca:

The Grey-headed Albatross (Thalassarche chrysostoma) is an endangered  albatross of the Southern Ocean, averaging 81 cm (32 in) in length and 2.2 m (7.2 ft) in wingspan, which breeds further south than any other mollymawk. Though its common name derives from the species’ ashy-grey head, throat and upper neck, the scientific name is a reference to the bright golden streaks on its bill.

Photographs: adult - JJ Harrison; chick - Ben Tullis

(via: Wikipedia)

rhamphotheca:

GOOD NEWS:

New population of Critically Endangered parakeets found in Brazil

Researchers supported by the Conservation Leadership Programme have uncovered a small population of grey-breasted parakeets nesting on a mountain in north-east Brazil.

by Sarah Rakowski

A team of scientists searching for remnant populations of the Critically Endangered grey-breasted parakeet has found a small group nesting in a small crevice on the top of a rugged mountain ridge in north-east Brazil.

Only around 300 of these birds are thought to remain in the wild, all of which are found in the Brazilian state of Ceará.

As part of a national action plan for the species, researchers from local organisation Aquasis have searched more than 20 sites for signs of the parakeet, focusing their efforts on areas identified as having high habitat potential or historical sightings.

This new discovery brings the total number of known groups up to three. By comparison, historical data show that at least 15 separate populations once existed…

(read more: Fauna & Flora International)

photos by Fabio Nunes and Aquasis

rhamphotheca:

What Can Humans Do to Save the Pacific Northwest’s Iconic Salmon?
The fish is facing an upstream struggle to survive. Can human ingenuity find a solution?
by Priscilla Long
Wild Pacific salmon are delicious to eat. But they mean more than a “tasty morsel.” Wild salmon and steelhead are iconic of wildlife, of indigenous Northwest lifestyles, of the streams they spawn in, of the ocean they spend half their lives in. Wild Pacific salmon stand for the Pacific Northwest.

They also stand for our present ecological emergency, what scientists term the Sixth Great Extinction, caused by global warming, invasive species and habitat degradation.

In the Pacific Northwest, 19 populations of wild salmon and steelhead are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. On the Skagit River these include chinook and steelhead. These are, of course, extant runs. Salmon have already gone extinct in 40 percent of their historical range…

(read more: Smithsonian Magazine)
photo: Chinook Salmon, by Elaine Thompson/AP Images

rhamphotheca:

What Can Humans Do to Save the Pacific Northwest’s Iconic Salmon?

The fish is facing an upstream struggle to survive. Can human ingenuity find a solution?

by Priscilla Long

Wild Pacific salmon are delicious to eat. But they mean more than a “tasty morsel.” Wild salmon and steelhead are iconic of wildlife, of indigenous Northwest lifestyles, of the streams they spawn in, of the ocean they spend half their lives in. Wild Pacific salmon stand for the Pacific Northwest.
They also stand for our present ecological emergency, what scientists term the Sixth Great Extinction, caused by global warming, invasive species and habitat degradation.
In the Pacific Northwest, 19 populations of wild salmon and steelhead are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. On the Skagit River these include chinook and steelhead. These are, of course, extant runs. Salmon have already gone extinct in 40 percent of their historical range…

(read more: Smithsonian Magazine)

photo: Chinook Salmon, by Elaine Thompson/AP Images

rhamphotheca:

A young volunteer holds hatchling Black Softshell Turtles (Nilssonia nigricans) that are being raised as part of a head start program at Nagshankar Temple in Assam. This is part of continuing efforts to re-establish this critically endangered turtle in India…
(read more: Turtle Survival Alliance)

rhamphotheca:

A young volunteer holds hatchling Black Softshell Turtles (Nilssonia nigricans) that are being raised as part of a head start program at Nagshankar Temple in Assam. This is part of continuing efforts to re-establish this critically endangered turtle in India…

(read more: Turtle Survival Alliance)