Anolis cusuco
Endangered on the IUCN Red List
Anolis cusuco is endemic to Cusuco National Park, Honduras. Its range is approximately 314 square kilometres and is under threat due to deforestation for agriculture. Further research into the habitat and threats to this species are needed.
Photo: Andrew M. Snyder on ARKive.

Anolis cusuco

Endangered on the IUCN Red List

Anolis cusuco is endemic to Cusuco National Park, Honduras. Its range is approximately 314 square kilometres and is under threat due to deforestation for agriculture. Further research into the habitat and threats to this species are needed.

Photo: Andrew M. Snyder on ARKive.

ecosapienshow:

Are we in the midst of a sixth mass extinction? 

Source -  NYT graphics editor Bill Marsh

libutron:

Tomas’ Worm Salamander - Oedipina tomasi
Definitely salamanders of the genus Oedipina are one of my favorites, don’t you think they look charming with her long body, its very short limbs, and tiny webbed feet?. Besides, as all other plethodontids, they lack lungs and breathe through their skin. Top it off, they lack aquatic larvae and hatch as miniature adults from eggs laid on land or terrestrial vegetation.
This is Oedipina tomasi (Plethodontidae), a Critically Endangered species only known from The Cusuco National Park in Honduras.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Andrew Snyder | Locality: Cusuco National Park, Honduras (2010)

libutron:

Tomas’ Worm Salamander - Oedipina tomasi

Definitely salamanders of the genus Oedipina are one of my favorites, don’t you think they look charming with her long body, its very short limbs, and tiny webbed feet?. Besides, as all other plethodontids, they lack lungs and breathe through their skin. Top it off, they lack aquatic larvae and hatch as miniature adults from eggs laid on land or terrestrial vegetation.

This is Oedipina tomasi (Plethodontidae), a Critically Endangered species only known from The Cusuco National Park in Honduras.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Andrew Snyder | Locality: Cusuco National Park, Honduras (2010)

Baird’s tapir (Tapirus bairdii)
Endangered on the IUCN Red List.
Tapirus bairdii is the largest native mammal of Central America, and is found from southern Mexico to northern Colombia. Little is known about this elusive species, but they are believed to live in pairs or small family groups. Its diet consists of vegetation, seeds, and fruit, and it often forages in forest clearings at night. When threatened, it will escape to water, where it is an adept swimmer. 
Habitat loss and hunting are the main threats to T. bairdii. The slow generation rate of this species means that any impact can be severe and population recovery is slow. Fewer than 500 are estimated to remain in Honduras. 
Although there a laws restricting hunting throughout the range of T. bairdii, these laws are poorly enforced. The Tapir Specialist Group have published a Species Action Plan outlining potential conservation measures including habitat protection and monitoring. 
Photo: Gerard Lacz on ARKive.

Baird’s tapir (Tapirus bairdii)

Endangered on the IUCN Red List.

Tapirus bairdii is the largest native mammal of Central America, and is found from southern Mexico to northern Colombia. Little is known about this elusive species, but they are believed to live in pairs or small family groups. Its diet consists of vegetation, seeds, and fruit, and it often forages in forest clearings at night. When threatened, it will escape to water, where it is an adept swimmer. 

Habitat loss and hunting are the main threats to T. bairdii. The slow generation rate of this species means that any impact can be severe and population recovery is slow. Fewer than 500 are estimated to remain in Honduras. 

Although there a laws restricting hunting throughout the range of T. bairdii, these laws are poorly enforced. The Tapir Specialist Group have published a Species Action Plan outlining potential conservation measures including habitat protection and monitoring. 

Photo: Gerard Lacz on ARKive.

Plectrohyla exquisita
Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List.
Plectrohyla exquisita is a frog endemic to Cusuco National Park in Honduras. It lives in and around streams in montane forest. As well as habitat loss, the fungal disease chytridiomycosis poses a significant threat to this species. 

Plectrohyla exquisita

Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List.

Plectrohyla exquisita is a frog endemic to Cusuco National Park in Honduras. It lives in and around streams in montane forest. As well as habitat loss, the fungal disease chytridiomycosis poses a significant threat to this species. 

libutron:

Guifarro’s palm-pitviper - A lethal beauty
Bothriechis guifarroi (Viperidae) is a species of palm-pitviper just described in 2013 from Refugio de Vida Silvestre Texíguat in northern Honduras.
This viper has a bright green dorsal coloration with pale blue trim on anterior edges of dorsal scales, and pale blue postocular stripe with green along the keels in center of stripe. The iris is pale green, pale gray, or pale tan.
The specimen shown is a juvenile of the species, which was photographed and collected in one of two expeditions in 2010, which provided the individuals from which this taxon was described.
This beautiful but venomous snake represents the 15th endemic species occurring in the Texiguat Wildlife Refuge in Honduras.
Although due to the recent description of the species its venom has not yet been characterized, it is highly probable to present similar characteristics and toxicity to the venom of other species of pit vipers of the genus Bothriechis.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Josiah Townsend | Locality: Cerro El Chino, above La Liberacion, Reserva de Vida Silvestre Texiguat, Honduras (2010)

libutron:

Guifarro’s palm-pitviper - A lethal beauty

Bothriechis guifarroi (Viperidae) is a species of palm-pitviper just described in 2013 from Refugio de Vida Silvestre Texíguat in northern Honduras.

This viper has a bright green dorsal coloration with pale blue trim on anterior edges of dorsal scales, and pale blue postocular stripe with green along the keels in center of stripe. The iris is pale green, pale gray, or pale tan.

The specimen shown is a juvenile of the species, which was photographed and collected in one of two expeditions in 2010, which provided the individuals from which this taxon was described.

This beautiful but venomous snake represents the 15th endemic species occurring in the Texiguat Wildlife Refuge in Honduras.

Although due to the recent description of the species its venom has not yet been characterized, it is highly probable to present similar characteristics and toxicity to the venom of other species of pit vipers of the genus Bothriechis.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Josiah Townsend | Locality: Cerro El Chino, above La Liberacion, Reserva de Vida Silvestre Texiguat, Honduras (2010)

Resplendent quetzal (Pharomachrus mocinno)
Endangered on the US Endangered Species Act
Pharomachrus mocinno is found in cloud forest throughout Central America, including Honduras. The male has beautiful metallic green plumage and extremely long tail feathers, which are used in breeding displays. Both the male and female take care of the young, which are fed on insects and small vertebrates. The adult diet consists mainly of fruit, particularly avocados. 
Deforestation of cloud forest for agriculture and hunting are the main threats to P. mocinno. 
P. mocinno is not protected in Honduras, but is protected in other Central American countries. However, enforcement is poor is remote areas. Costa Rica has effective conservation strategies in place, although these only protect breeding grounds, and not the lowland feeding grounds.
Photo: Kevin Schafer on ARKive.

Resplendent quetzal (Pharomachrus mocinno)

Endangered on the US Endangered Species Act

Pharomachrus mocinno is found in cloud forest throughout Central America, including Honduras. The male has beautiful metallic green plumage and extremely long tail feathers, which are used in breeding displays. Both the male and female take care of the young, which are fed on insects and small vertebrates. The adult diet consists mainly of fruit, particularly avocados. 

Deforestation of cloud forest for agriculture and hunting are the main threats to P. mocinno. 

P. mocinno is not protected in Honduras, but is protected in other Central American countries. However, enforcement is poor is remote areas. Costa Rica has effective conservation strategies in place, although these only protect breeding grounds, and not the lowland feeding grounds.

Photo: Kevin Schafer on ARKive.

unknown-endangered:

Utila spiny-tailed iguana (Ctenosaura bakeri)
Critically endangered on the IUCN Red List.
Ctenosaura bakeri lives only on the island of Utila off the coast of Honduras. It gets its name from the enlarged spiny scales on its tail. Unlike many reptiles, males are bigger than females, and are also distinguished by the dewlap on the throat. It spends most of its time in mangroves, but females move to the beach to lay their eggs. 
The mangroves that C. bakeri inhabits are being cleared for construction and also being covered with waste. As it lives on a single tiny island, this iguana is extremely vulnerable to extinction. Despite being illegal, it is also sometimes hunted for meat.
A project aiming to conserve C. bakeri has been in effect since 1994, by promoting sustainable development and environmental awareness on Utila. A captive breeding programme was set up in 1998 in the Iguana Station on the island. Further programmes have been carried out by London Zoo. 
Photo: Antoine Motte dit Falisse on Wikipedia.

unknown-endangered:

Utila spiny-tailed iguana (Ctenosaura bakeri)

Critically endangered on the IUCN Red List.

Ctenosaura bakeri lives only on the island of Utila off the coast of Honduras. It gets its name from the enlarged spiny scales on its tail. Unlike many reptiles, males are bigger than females, and are also distinguished by the dewlap on the throat. It spends most of its time in mangroves, but females move to the beach to lay their eggs. 

The mangroves that C. bakeri inhabits are being cleared for construction and also being covered with waste. As it lives on a single tiny island, this iguana is extremely vulnerable to extinction. Despite being illegal, it is also sometimes hunted for meat.

A project aiming to conserve C. bakeri has been in effect since 1994, by promoting sustainable development and environmental awareness on Utila. A captive breeding programme was set up in 1998 in the Iguana Station on the island. Further programmes have been carried out by London Zoo. 

Photo: Antoine Motte dit Falisse on Wikipedia.

Now I’m back from my trip, I’ll post about endangered species in Honduras!

Now I’m back from my trip, I’ll post about endangered species in Honduras!

Unknown + Endangered goes to Honduras!
Between 8th July - 6th August, I will be in Honduras helping out with some ecological and conservation research in Cusuco National Park, Honduras. 
I don’t have much queued up, but I will be back with photos :)

Unknown + Endangered goes to Honduras!

Between 8th July - 6th August, I will be in Honduras helping out with some ecological and conservation research in Cusuco National Park, Honduras. 

I don’t have much queued up, but I will be back with photos :)

dendroica:

California Native Orchid is Endangered, Say International Scientists

A California native orchid once found from the Bay Area and Sierra Nevada northward into Oregon has declined in population so steeply that the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has declared the plant globally Endangered.
Cypripedium californicum, also known as the California lady’s slipper orchid, grows up to three feet tall with as many as 20 white flowers on a stem. It’s restricted to wet soil such as stream banks in open conifer forests, and the last century’s worth of clearcutting in those forests has proven disastrous for the species. So has collection for the horticultural trade.
The listing was part of a major update to the IUCN’s Red List of Threatened Species, in which 817 species were newly listed under various categories of threat. That includes 79 percent of the world’s known slipper orchid species such as Cypripedium californicum.

(via ReWild | KCET)

dendroica:

California Native Orchid is Endangered, Say International Scientists

A California native orchid once found from the Bay Area and Sierra Nevada northward into Oregon has declined in population so steeply that the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has declared the plant globally Endangered.

Cypripedium californicum, also known as the California lady’s slipper orchid, grows up to three feet tall with as many as 20 white flowers on a stem. It’s restricted to wet soil such as stream banks in open conifer forests, and the last century’s worth of clearcutting in those forests has proven disastrous for the species. So has collection for the horticultural trade.

The listing was part of a major update to the IUCN’s Red List of Threatened Species, in which 817 species were newly listed under various categories of threat. That includes 79 percent of the world’s known slipper orchid species such as Cypripedium californicum.

(via ReWild | KCET)

rhamphotheca:

Saving the Tenkile: an expedition to protect one of the most endangered animals you’ve never heard of

by Jordanna Dulaney

The tenkile, or the Scott’s tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus scottae) could be a cross between a koala bear and a puppy. With it’s fuzzy dark fur, long tail and snout, and tiny ears, it’s difficult to imagine a more adorable animal. It’s also difficult to imagine that the tenkile is one of the most endangered species on Earth: only an estimated 300 remain.

According to the Tenkile Conservation Alliance (TCA), the tenkile’s trouble stems from a sharp increase of human settlements in the Torricelli mountain range. Once relatively isolated, the tenkile now struggles to avoid hunters and towns while still having sufficient range to live in. The TCA also suggests the cultural shift in Papua New Guinea’s Torricelli natives could contribute to the animal’s decline: an influx of Catholic missionaries lead to a mass conversion of many of the natives.

While the tenkile’s habitat was traditionally off limits for hunting for fear of spirits, the natives now hunt there regularly; instead of bows and arrows, they use guns…

(read more: MongaBay)