cool-critters:

Horned guan (Oreophasis derbianus)

The horned guan is a large, approximately 85 cm long, turkey-like bird. is distributed in humid mountain forests of southeast Mexico-(Chiapas) and Guatemala of Central America. Its diet consists mainly of fruits, green leaves and invertebrates. This species is the only survivor of a very ancient lineage of cracids that has been evolving independently from all other living members of this family for at least 20, possibly as much as 40 million years. Due to ongoing habitat loss, small population size, limited range and hunting in some areas, the horned guan is evaluated as Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

photo credits: revuemag, guppiecat, stlzoo

rhamphotheca:

The Grey-headed Albatross (Thalassarche chrysostoma) is an endangered  albatross of the Southern Ocean, averaging 81 cm (32 in) in length and 2.2 m (7.2 ft) in wingspan, which breeds further south than any other mollymawk. Though its common name derives from the species’ ashy-grey head, throat and upper neck, the scientific name is a reference to the bright golden streaks on its bill.

Photographs: adult - JJ Harrison; chick - Ben Tullis

(via: Wikipedia)

rhamphotheca:

GOOD NEWS:

New population of Critically Endangered parakeets found in Brazil

Researchers supported by the Conservation Leadership Programme have uncovered a small population of grey-breasted parakeets nesting on a mountain in north-east Brazil.

by Sarah Rakowski

A team of scientists searching for remnant populations of the Critically Endangered grey-breasted parakeet has found a small group nesting in a small crevice on the top of a rugged mountain ridge in north-east Brazil.

Only around 300 of these birds are thought to remain in the wild, all of which are found in the Brazilian state of Ceará.

As part of a national action plan for the species, researchers from local organisation Aquasis have searched more than 20 sites for signs of the parakeet, focusing their efforts on areas identified as having high habitat potential or historical sightings.

This new discovery brings the total number of known groups up to three. By comparison, historical data show that at least 15 separate populations once existed…

(read more: Fauna & Flora International)

photos by Fabio Nunes and Aquasis

rhamphotheca:

What Can Humans Do to Save the Pacific Northwest’s Iconic Salmon?
The fish is facing an upstream struggle to survive. Can human ingenuity find a solution?
by Priscilla Long
Wild Pacific salmon are delicious to eat. But they mean more than a “tasty morsel.” Wild salmon and steelhead are iconic of wildlife, of indigenous Northwest lifestyles, of the streams they spawn in, of the ocean they spend half their lives in. Wild Pacific salmon stand for the Pacific Northwest.

They also stand for our present ecological emergency, what scientists term the Sixth Great Extinction, caused by global warming, invasive species and habitat degradation.

In the Pacific Northwest, 19 populations of wild salmon and steelhead are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. On the Skagit River these include chinook and steelhead. These are, of course, extant runs. Salmon have already gone extinct in 40 percent of their historical range…

(read more: Smithsonian Magazine)
photo: Chinook Salmon, by Elaine Thompson/AP Images

rhamphotheca:

What Can Humans Do to Save the Pacific Northwest’s Iconic Salmon?

The fish is facing an upstream struggle to survive. Can human ingenuity find a solution?

by Priscilla Long

Wild Pacific salmon are delicious to eat. But they mean more than a “tasty morsel.” Wild salmon and steelhead are iconic of wildlife, of indigenous Northwest lifestyles, of the streams they spawn in, of the ocean they spend half their lives in. Wild Pacific salmon stand for the Pacific Northwest.
They also stand for our present ecological emergency, what scientists term the Sixth Great Extinction, caused by global warming, invasive species and habitat degradation.
In the Pacific Northwest, 19 populations of wild salmon and steelhead are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. On the Skagit River these include chinook and steelhead. These are, of course, extant runs. Salmon have already gone extinct in 40 percent of their historical range…

(read more: Smithsonian Magazine)

photo: Chinook Salmon, by Elaine Thompson/AP Images

rhamphotheca:

A young volunteer holds hatchling Black Softshell Turtles (Nilssonia nigricans) that are being raised as part of a head start program at Nagshankar Temple in Assam. This is part of continuing efforts to re-establish this critically endangered turtle in India…
(read more: Turtle Survival Alliance)

rhamphotheca:

A young volunteer holds hatchling Black Softshell Turtles (Nilssonia nigricans) that are being raised as part of a head start program at Nagshankar Temple in Assam. This is part of continuing efforts to re-establish this critically endangered turtle in India…

(read more: Turtle Survival Alliance)

astronomy-to-zoology:

Depressed River Mussel (Pseudantodonta complanta)
Also known as the compressed river mussel due to its flattened shape, the depressed river mussel is a species of freshwater Unionid bivalve, which is found throughout northern Europe, where it is endangered. Like other Unionids P. complanta is a filter feeder and will filter the water around it for nutrients.  
Although Pseudanodonta complanata is listed as vulnerable by the IUCN, it is considered endangered and critically endangered in parts of its range. One of its main threats is though to be the pollution and dredging of slow-moving water channels were it lives. 
Classification
Animalia-Mollusca-Bivalvia-Paleaoheterodonta-Unionida-Unonidae-Pseudantodonta-P. complanta
Image: Tom Meijer

astronomy-to-zoology:

Depressed River Mussel (Pseudantodonta complanta)

Also known as the compressed river mussel due to its flattened shape, the depressed river mussel is a species of freshwater Unionid bivalve, which is found throughout northern Europe, where it is endangered. Like other Unionids P. complanta is a filter feeder and will filter the water around it for nutrients.  

Although Pseudanodonta complanata is listed as vulnerable by the IUCN, it is considered endangered and critically endangered in parts of its range. One of its main threats is though to be the pollution and dredging of slow-moving water channels were it lives. 

Classification

Animalia-Mollusca-Bivalvia-Paleaoheterodonta-Unionida-Unonidae-Pseudantodonta-P. complanta

Image: Tom Meijer

palaeopedia:

Le long-tailed Chinchilla, Chinchilla lanigera (1829)
Phylum : ChordataClass : MammaliaOrder : RodentiaFamily : ChinchillidaeGenus : ChinchillaSpecies : C. lanigera
Critically endangered
26 cm long and 450 g (size)
Chile (map)
The long-tailed chinchilla, is one of two species of rodents from the genus Chinchilla, the other species being Chinchilla chinchilla. Wild populations of C. lanigera occur in Aucó, near Illapel, IV Región, Chile , in Reserva Nacional Las Chinchillas and in La Higuera, about 100 km  north of Coquimbo Chilean chinchillas were reported from Talca , Chile, reaching north to Peru and eastward from Chilean coastal hills throughout low mountains. By the mid-19th century, Chilean chinchillas were not found south of the Choapa River.
The Chilean chinchilla is endangered, with the second-highest conservation priority among Chilean mammals.

palaeopedia:

Le long-tailed Chinchilla, Chinchilla lanigera (1829)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Mammalia
Order : Rodentia
Family : Chinchillidae
Genus : Chinchilla
Species : C. lanigera

  • Critically endangered
  • 26 cm long and 450 g (size)
  • Chile (map)

The long-tailed chinchilla, is one of two species of rodents from the genus Chinchilla, the other species being Chinchilla chinchilla. Wild populations of C. lanigera occur in Aucó, near Illapel, IV Región, Chile , in Reserva Nacional Las Chinchillas and in La Higuera, about 100 km  north of Coquimbo Chilean chinchillas were reported from Talca , Chile, reaching north to Peru and eastward from Chilean coastal hills throughout low mountains. By the mid-19th century, Chilean chinchillas were not found south of the Choapa River.

The Chilean chinchilla is endangered, with the second-highest conservation priority among Chilean mammals.

turtleconservancy:

Back in 2012, William Finnegan of The New Yorker traveled to Madagascar with the Turtle Conservancy to document the plight of the Critically Endangered Ploughshare Tortoise (Astrochelys yniphora). These beautiful animals have been pushed to the brink of extinction due to the illegal wildlife trade. newyorker 

turtleconservancy:

Back in 2012, William Finnegan of The New Yorker traveled to Madagascar with the Turtle Conservancy to document the plight of the Critically Endangered Ploughshare Tortoise (Astrochelys yniphora). These beautiful animals have been pushed to the brink of extinction due to the illegal wildlife trade. newyorker 

dendroica:

Spain’s endangered Iberian lynx brought back from brink of extinction

Ten years ago the Iberian lynx was nearing extinction but today, thanks to an imaginative conservation programme that has brought hunters, farmers and the tourist industry under its wing, its numbers have tripled from 94 to 312.
"We can’t claim victory yet but now there is hope," said Miguel Ángel Simón, the director of the programme for the recovery of the lynx in Andalusia, southern Spain. Only five years ago the animal was classified as critically endangered.
The project, which is jointly funded by the Andalusian government and the European Union, has been singled out for the second time by the EU as an exemplary conservation programme. Brussels is funding 40% of the €26m (£22m) needed to extend the project into the neighbouring regions of Extremadura, Castile-La Mancha and Murcia, as well as Portugal.
According to Simón, when they first carried out a census in the lynx’s key habitats in the Sierra Morena and the Doñana national park, not only were there few lynxes but the rabbit population had also been severely depleted by disease. Rabbits are the lynx’s main source of food.

(via guardian.co.uk)

dendroica:

Spain’s endangered Iberian lynx brought back from brink of extinction

Ten years ago the Iberian lynx was nearing extinction but today, thanks to an imaginative conservation programme that has brought hunters, farmers and the tourist industry under its wing, its numbers have tripled from 94 to 312.

"We can’t claim victory yet but now there is hope," said Miguel Ángel Simón, the director of the programme for the recovery of the lynx in Andalusia, southern Spain. Only five years ago the animal was classified as critically endangered.

The project, which is jointly funded by the Andalusian government and the European Union, has been singled out for the second time by the EU as an exemplary conservation programme. Brussels is funding 40% of the €26m (£22m) needed to extend the project into the neighbouring regions of Extremadura, Castile-La Mancha and Murcia, as well as Portugal.

According to Simón, when they first carried out a census in the lynx’s key habitats in the Sierra Morena and the Doñana national park, not only were there few lynxes but the rabbit population had also been severely depleted by disease. Rabbits are the lynx’s main source of food.

(via guardian.co.uk)

mindblowingscience:

Wild Chinese sturgeon on brink of extinction: state media

The wild Chinese sturgeon is at risk of extinction, state media reported, after none of the rare fish were detected reproducing naturally in the polluted and crowded Yangtze river last year.

One of the world’s oldest living species, the wild Chinese sturgeon are thought to have existed for more than 140 million years but have seen their numbers crash as China’s economic boom brings with it pollution, dams and boat traffic along the world’s third-longest river.
For the first time since researchers began keeping records 32 years ago, there was no natural reproduction of wild Chinese sturgeon in 2013, according to a report published by the Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences.
No eggs were found to have been laid by wild sturgeons in an area in central China’s Hubei province, and no young sturgeons were found swimming along the Yangtze toward the sea in August, the month when they typically do so.
"No natural reproduction means that the sturgeons would not expand its population and without protection, they might risk extinction," Wei Qiwei, an investigator with the academy, told China’s official Xinhua news agency on Saturday.
The fish is classed as “critically endangered” on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s “Red List” of threatened species, just one level ahead of “extinct in the wild”.
Only around 100 of the sturgeon remain, Wei said, compared with several thousand in the 1980s.
Chinese authorities have built dozens of dams—including the world’s largest, the Three Gorges—along the Yangtze river, which campaigners say have led to environmental degradation and disrupted the habitats of a range of endangered species.
Many sturgeon have also been killed, injured by ship propellers or after becoming tangled in fishermen’s nets.
Animal populations in many of China’s ecosystems have plummeted during the country’s decades of development and urbanisation, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) said in a 2012 study.
According to findings compiled by WWF from various sources, the Yangtze river dolphin population crashed by 99.4 percent from 1980 to 2006, while that of the Chinese alligator fell by 97 percent from 1955 to 2010.

mindblowingscience:

Wild Chinese sturgeon on brink of extinction: state media

The wild Chinese sturgeon is at risk of extinction, state media reported, after none of the rare fish were detected reproducing naturally in the polluted and crowded Yangtze river last year.

One of the world’s oldest living species, the wild Chinese sturgeon are thought to have existed for more than 140 million years but have seen their numbers crash as China’s  brings with it pollution, dams and boat traffic along the world’s third-longest river.

For the first time since researchers began keeping records 32 years ago, there was no natural reproduction of wild Chinese sturgeon in 2013, according to a report published by the Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences.

No eggs were found to have been laid by wild sturgeons in an area in central China’s Hubei province, and no young sturgeons were found swimming along the Yangtze toward the sea in August, the month when they typically do so.

"No natural reproduction means that the sturgeons would not expand its population and without protection, they might risk extinction," Wei Qiwei, an investigator with the academy, told China’s official Xinhua news agency on Saturday.

The fish is classed as “critically endangered” on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s “Red List” of threatened species, just one level ahead of “extinct in the wild”.

Only around 100 of the sturgeon remain, Wei said, compared with several thousand in the 1980s.

Chinese authorities have built dozens of dams—including the world’s largest, the Three Gorges—along the Yangtze river, which campaigners say have led to environmental degradation and disrupted the habitats of a range of .

Many sturgeon have also been killed, injured by ship propellers or after becoming tangled in fishermen’s nets.

Animal populations in many of China’s ecosystems have plummeted during the country’s decades of development and urbanisation, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) said in a 2012 study.

According to findings compiled by WWF from various sources, the Yangtze river dolphin population crashed by 99.4 percent from 1980 to 2006, while that of the Chinese alligator fell by 97 percent from 1955 to 2010.