Unknown + Endangered goes to Honduras!
Between 8th July - 6th August, I will be in Honduras helping out with some ecological and conservation research in Cusuco National Park, Honduras. 
I don’t have much queued up, but I will be back with photos :)

Unknown + Endangered goes to Honduras!

Between 8th July - 6th August, I will be in Honduras helping out with some ecological and conservation research in Cusuco National Park, Honduras. 

I don’t have much queued up, but I will be back with photos :)

dendroica:

California Native Orchid is Endangered, Say International Scientists

A California native orchid once found from the Bay Area and Sierra Nevada northward into Oregon has declined in population so steeply that the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has declared the plant globally Endangered.
Cypripedium californicum, also known as the California lady’s slipper orchid, grows up to three feet tall with as many as 20 white flowers on a stem. It’s restricted to wet soil such as stream banks in open conifer forests, and the last century’s worth of clearcutting in those forests has proven disastrous for the species. So has collection for the horticultural trade.
The listing was part of a major update to the IUCN’s Red List of Threatened Species, in which 817 species were newly listed under various categories of threat. That includes 79 percent of the world’s known slipper orchid species such as Cypripedium californicum.

(via ReWild | KCET)

dendroica:

California Native Orchid is Endangered, Say International Scientists

A California native orchid once found from the Bay Area and Sierra Nevada northward into Oregon has declined in population so steeply that the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has declared the plant globally Endangered.

Cypripedium californicum, also known as the California lady’s slipper orchid, grows up to three feet tall with as many as 20 white flowers on a stem. It’s restricted to wet soil such as stream banks in open conifer forests, and the last century’s worth of clearcutting in those forests has proven disastrous for the species. So has collection for the horticultural trade.

The listing was part of a major update to the IUCN’s Red List of Threatened Species, in which 817 species were newly listed under various categories of threat. That includes 79 percent of the world’s known slipper orchid species such as Cypripedium californicum.

(via ReWild | KCET)

rhamphotheca:

Saving the Tenkile: an expedition to protect one of the most endangered animals you’ve never heard of

by Jordanna Dulaney

The tenkile, or the Scott’s tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus scottae) could be a cross between a koala bear and a puppy. With it’s fuzzy dark fur, long tail and snout, and tiny ears, it’s difficult to imagine a more adorable animal. It’s also difficult to imagine that the tenkile is one of the most endangered species on Earth: only an estimated 300 remain.

According to the Tenkile Conservation Alliance (TCA), the tenkile’s trouble stems from a sharp increase of human settlements in the Torricelli mountain range. Once relatively isolated, the tenkile now struggles to avoid hunters and towns while still having sufficient range to live in. The TCA also suggests the cultural shift in Papua New Guinea’s Torricelli natives could contribute to the animal’s decline: an influx of Catholic missionaries lead to a mass conversion of many of the natives.

While the tenkile’s habitat was traditionally off limits for hunting for fear of spirits, the natives now hunt there regularly; instead of bows and arrows, they use guns…

(read more: MongaBay)

Hawaiian crow (Corvus hawaiiensis)
Extinct in the Wild
Corvus hawaiiensis is also known as the alala, and is endemic to Hawaii. It mainly feeds on fruit, and may also eat nectar and insects. A small captive population is kept on the island of Maui, after the only wild population on Hawaii became extinct. Although it was once common, this species declined due to habitat loss, hunting, and invasive species. 

Hawaiian crow (Corvus hawaiiensis)

Extinct in the Wild

Corvus hawaiiensis is also known as the alala, and is endemic to Hawaii. It mainly feeds on fruit, and may also eat nectar and insects. A small captive population is kept on the island of Maui, after the only wild population on Hawaii became extinct. Although it was once common, this species declined due to habitat loss, hunting, and invasive species. 

rapax-anamalia:

IUCN’s ‘Red List' of Endangered Species was updated last week and shows that two of the most at risk species are lemurs and temperate slipper orchids,

90 out of the known 101 species of Lemur are threatened with extinction, and 20% are are listed as critically endangered. The main threat is from illegal logging of tropical forests of Madagascar (the only place they are found), which has accelerated in recent years.

79% of Temperate Slipper Orchid species - found across North America, Europe and Asia - are threatened with extinction due to habitat destruction and overcollection.

Source and other changes to the Red List

rhamphotheca:

The male Panamanian Golden Frog (Atelopus zeteki) has a subtle way of attracting females… it waves. This friendly gesture can arouse the attention of a rival male, which often ends in a wrestling match.

* Since this footage was filmed, this species has gone extinct in the wild due to the deadly chytrid fungus. Conservationists now care for the last of this frog in various zoos and other institutions.

with David Attenborrough

(via: Nature - PBS)

fyeah-history:

Only known photo of an alleged live Tarpan, which may have been a hybrid or feral animal, 1884Tarpan (Equus ferus ferus), also known as Eurasian wild horse, is an extinct subspecies of wild horse. The last individual believed to be of this subspecies died in captivity in Russia in 1909, although some sources claim that it was not a genuine wild horse due to its resemblance to domesticated horses.

fyeah-history:

Only known photo of an alleged live Tarpan, which may have been a hybrid or feral animal, 1884
Tarpan (Equus ferus ferus), also known as Eurasian wild horse, is an extinct subspecies of wild horse. The last individual believed to be of this subspecies died in captivity in Russia in 1909, although some sources claim that it was not a genuine wild horse due to its resemblance to domesticated horses.

rhamphotheca:

The World’s Most Endangered Frogs:
Golden Mantella (Mantella aurantiaca)
Status: Critically-Endangered
The brightly-colored Golden Mantella lives in the rainforests of central-east Madagascar. Females lay their eggs on the forest floor and the tadpoles that emerge are swept into swamps, temporary ponds and flooded forests. The frog’s main threats are habitat loss due to agriculture and logging, but experts also worry about over-collection due to its popularity amongst frog enthusiasts.
(read more: Nature - PBS)
photo by Robin Moore

rhamphotheca:

The World’s Most Endangered Frogs:

Golden Mantella (Mantella aurantiaca)

Status: Critically-Endangered

The brightly-colored Golden Mantella lives in the rainforests of central-east Madagascar. Females lay their eggs on the forest floor and the tadpoles that emerge are swept into swamps, temporary ponds and flooded forests. The frog’s main threats are habitat loss due to agriculture and logging, but experts also worry about over-collection due to its popularity amongst frog enthusiasts.

(read more: Nature - PBS)

photo by Robin Moore

mothernaturenetwork:

Extinct bat rediscovered after 120 years without a sightingA bat species thought to be long extinct has been caught by researchers in Papua New Guinea, over a century after the first and only specimens were collected.

mothernaturenetwork:

Extinct bat rediscovered after 120 years without a sighting
A bat species thought to be long extinct has been caught by researchers in Papua New Guinea, over a century after the first and only specimens were collected.

Kihansi spray toad (Nectophrynoides asperginis)
Extinct in the Wild
Nectophrynoides asperginis is endemic to the Kihansi Falls in eastern Tanzania. It is specially adapted to cope with the spray from the falls by having flaps covering the nostrils. It may also communicate with others visually, instead of calling, due to the noise of the falls. It is ovoviviparous, and gives birth to live young after the tadpoles develop while still inside the female. 
In 2000, a dam was built upstream of the habitat of N. asperginis, which greatly reduced the water flow and quality of the water. In 1999, there were an estimated 20,000 individuals in the Upper Spray Wetland, but it was declared extinct in the wild in 2009. 
Several facilities in the US have been breeding N. asperginis since 2000, when 499 toads were collected from the wild. By 2012, over 6000 had been raised and 2500 were reintroduced to Tanzania. Studies into this species’ diet, and the microclimate and vegetation of its habitat have helped to improve the chances of a successful reintroduction. 


Photo: Tim Herman on IUCN.

Kihansi spray toad (Nectophrynoides asperginis)

Extinct in the Wild

Nectophrynoides asperginis is endemic to the Kihansi Falls in eastern Tanzania. It is specially adapted to cope with the spray from the falls by having flaps covering the nostrils. It may also communicate with others visually, instead of calling, due to the noise of the falls. It is ovoviviparous, and gives birth to live young after the tadpoles develop while still inside the female. 

In 2000, a dam was built upstream of the habitat of N. asperginis, which greatly reduced the water flow and quality of the water. In 1999, there were an estimated 20,000 individuals in the Upper Spray Wetland, but it was declared extinct in the wild in 2009. 

Several facilities in the US have been breeding N. asperginis since 2000, when 499 toads were collected from the wild. By 2012, over 6000 had been raised and 2500 were reintroduced to Tanzania. Studies into this species’ diet, and the microclimate and vegetation of its habitat have helped to improve the chances of a successful reintroduction. 

Photo: Tim Herman on IUCN.

rhamphotheca:

Extinct 30 years ago - the short-haired bumble bee takes to the skies 
by Michael Parker
The short haired bumblebee was declared extinct in the UK 30 years ago. But now the species is being re-introduced in the flower-rich meadows and field margins of Kent, writes Michael Parker - helped along by sympathetic local farmers.
A species of bee declared extinct in the UK almost 30 years ago is flying again - thanks in part to the efforts of farmers. Researchers have been restoring the short-haired bumblebee to Romney Marsh and Dungeness over the past three years, and the results are starting to come in.
Nikki Gammans and her team have travelled to Sweden each year since 2012 to collect around 100 queen bees, transport them back to Britain and, after a two week quarantine period, release them into the flower-rich countryside of Kent…
(read more: TheEcologist)
photograph by Nikki Gammans

rhamphotheca:

Extinct 30 years ago - the short-haired bumble bee takes to the skies 

by Michael Parker

The short haired bumblebee was declared extinct in the UK 30 years ago. But now the species is being re-introduced in the flower-rich meadows and field margins of Kent, writes Michael Parker - helped along by sympathetic local farmers.

A species of bee declared extinct in the UK almost 30 years ago is flying again - thanks in part to the efforts of farmers. Researchers have been restoring the short-haired bumblebee to Romney Marsh and Dungeness over the past three years, and the results are starting to come in.

Nikki Gammans and her team have travelled to Sweden each year since 2012 to collect around 100 queen bees, transport them back to Britain and, after a two week quarantine period, release them into the flower-rich countryside of Kent…

(read more: TheEcologist)

photograph by Nikki Gammans

rhamphotheca:

Climate Change Could Be the End for the Tuatara
by Olivia Wannan
Male tuatara can expect lonely love lives as the climate warms - before they eventually become extinct.
Males are already starting to outnumber females on Cook Strait’s North Brother Island, Victoria University researchers have found. The issue stems from how the gender of these reptiles is determined in the eggs.
Clutches exposed to warmer temperatures produce male hatchlings. Because of this, rising temperatures from climate change could lead to disastrous results for the island population, researcher Nicky Nelson said…
(read more: Stuff.co.nz)

rhamphotheca:

Climate Change Could Be the End for the Tuatara

by Olivia Wannan

Male tuatara can expect lonely love lives as the climate warms - before they eventually become extinct.

Males are already starting to outnumber females on Cook Strait’s North Brother Island, Victoria University researchers have found. The issue stems from how the gender of these reptiles is determined in the eggs.

Clutches exposed to warmer temperatures produce male hatchlings. Because of this, rising temperatures from climate change could lead to disastrous results for the island population, researcher Nicky Nelson said…

(read more: Stuff.co.nz)